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11/18/2018, 13:38, Vienna  DEUTSCH / ENGLISH




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Calendar

This section can be used by universities, psychoanalytic associations, publishers, auction houses and museums to call attention to their offers relevant to psychoanalysis.
In this way our international users shall be informed more quickly about where and when upcoming congresses, conferences, auctions and book launches will take place.

If you are interested, please email to calendar@theviennapsychoanalyst.at for further information.



Freud, Dalí and the Metamorphosis of Narcissus

10/03/2018 - 02/24/2019

open to public
Organizer: Freud Museum London
Venue: Freud Museum London
20 Maresfield Gardens
NW3 5SX London
United Kingdom
>> Website

Sigmund Freud and Salvador Dalí are two of the most significant and influential figures of the twentieth century.
Dalí was a passionate admirer of the father of psychoanalysis and finally met him in London on July 19th 1938. This year 2018 marks the 80th anniversary of this event. A new exhibition at the Freud Museum will explore the connection between the two men, starting from their one meeting, to which Dalí brought his recently completed painting The Metamorphosis of Narcissus.

The painting, on loan from the Tate, will be the central point in the exhibition for an exploration of the extensive influence of Freud on Dalí and on Surrealism. Also considered will be Freud’s own attitude to painting, illuminated by his response to this encounter with Dalí.

Dalí had read The Interpretation of Dreams as an art student in Madrid in the early 1920s. This was, he wrote, “one of the capital discoveries of my life, and I was seized with a real vice of self-interpretation, not only of my dreams but of everything that happened to me.” This passion for self-interpretation took not just visual but also written form. In 1933 Dalí wrote a “psycho-analytical essay”, as he described it, on the famous painting by Jean-François Millet, The Angelus. The essay was eventually published as a book, The Tragic Myth of Millet’s ‘Angelus’. In it, Dalí explores his own obsession with the painting, which he lays out in the form of a Freudian case history.

In 1938, after several attempts, Dalí finally met his hero Freud, newly arrived in London after fleeing from Nazi-occupied Vienna. The meeting was brokered by Stefan Zweig, who was present, together with Dalí’s friend and patron Edward James, who owned The Metamorphosis of Narcissus. Dalí hoped his painting would allow him to engage Freud in a discussion of the psychoanalytical theory of Narcissism and would help him to demonstrate his concept of critical paranoia.

Dali was given permission to sketch Freud during the visit. These drawings, now in the Fundacio Gala-Salvador Dalí in Spain, will be on display, and Dali’s long poem with the same title as the painting, The Metamorphosis of Narcissus. There will also be material from the Freud Museum’s archive and collections, shedding light on Freud’s attitude to Dalí and their meeting.

Other themes of the exhibition will include the classical origins of the myth of Narcissus and the place of narcissism in psychoanalytic thinking. Freud’s own collections will play a part. For example, they include a copy of the classical relief Gradiva; Freud’s study of Wilhelm Jensen’s novel Gradiva was the inspiration for some of Dalí’s important paintings and drawings on this theme from the early 1930s.

Through images, including original paintings and drawings, photographs and prints, and documents including letters, manuscripts, books and Freud’s appointment diary, the intense – if somewhat one-sided -relationship between two extraordinary thinkers and creators will be explored.

The exhibition will be curated by the distinguished art historian Dawn Ades, curator of the recent highly successful Dali/Duchamp exhibition at the Royal Academy of Arts.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a catalogue, and an exciting public programme, which will include lectures and debates on topics including Narcissism, the relationship between art and psychoanalysis through Freud’s writings on Leonardo and Michelangelo, Freud and surrealism, psychoanalysis and classicism, and Lacan’s debt to Dalí’s critical paranoia.

The Political Mind: A Deeper Cut

11/06/2018 - 12/04/2018

open to public
Organizer: Institute of Psychoanalysis
Venue: Byron House
112A Shirland Road
W9 2BT London
United Kingdom
>> Website
Join Philip Stokoe as he takes an in-depth look at Politics, Power and Fundamentalism in a series of five seminars

Philip is a Psychoanalyst (Fellow of the Institute of Psychoanalysis, Training Analyst with the British Psychotherapy Foundation) in private practice working with adults and couples, and an Organisational Consultant, providing consultation to a wide range of organisations. He worked as a Consultant Social Worker and Senior Lecturer in the Adult Department of the Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust from 1994 to 2012 finishing as Clinical Director. He writes and teaches on a wide range of topics including Psychoanalytic understanding of society and politics.

In this series, Philip will break down a psychoanalytic way to approach understanding politics and society, into three broad psychoanalytic ideas. He will begin by presenting in more detail a model of how a healthy organisation will function, which includes the way that individuals become caught up in organisational dynamics. Central to his understanding of these processes is the way that anxiety operates to push us all into a fundamentalist state of mind. This raises questions about thinking and the way to speak to somebody or a group who are operating from that position. This reveals the importance of unconscious beliefs and their link to ideologies. Philip will apply this way of understanding politics and society to the particular examples of the NHS and higher education. Finally, he will focus on the issues that lie behind the phenomenon of Brexit, particularly immigration and capital.

The Deeper Cut is part of The Political Mind series, chaired by David Morgan. The Political Mind series will be taking a break next year, so don’t miss out on this opportunity to explore politics through psychoanalysis!

The Uncanny: Art, Literature and the Clinic

11/24/2018 09:30

open to public
Organizer: Institute of Psychoanalysis
Venue: Byron House
112A Shirland Road
W9 2BT London
United Kingdom
>> Website
The centenary of the publication of Sigmund Freud’s “The Uncanny” will be celebrated next year. In this fascinating work, Freud argued that aesthetics should not be understood only as a “theory of beauty” but also as a “theory of the qualities of feeling”. The papers in this conference will explore the particular qualities of feeling that belong to the uncanny: unsettling experiences, sentiments of disquiet and strangeness usually sudden and temporary; they involve the perception of something familiar as de-realised or something unknown and yet bizarrely familiar, recognisable in works of art and literature. In the clinical situation, the analyst’s capacity to identify such states of mind in the patient, or in themselves, and his/her own capacity to bear them, are seen as essential to making possible a powerfully transforming psychoanalytic process.

The Repression and Abandonment of Oedipus: The role of the Oedipal situation in mental distress and disorder

11/30/2018 - 12/02/2018

open to public
Organizer: UCL - University College London
Venue: University College London
Gower St
WC1E 6BT London
United Kingdom
>> Website

Conference Abstract
The most nuclear of psychoanalytic ideas is the eponymously named Oedipus complex. Stated generally, it is that shifting patterns of triangular love, hate and rivalry exist universally: two are imagined to join as a cross-generational sexual pair transgressing the incest taboo. The third fears abandonment and feels murderous. These patterns determine whom we love and/or hate and how we see the differences, or absence of them, between the sexes. They operate in the genesis of guilt and mental disorders. They structure family and group dynamics. They interact with culture. This Conference aims at a current view of how we understand, and work with clinically, the phenomena to which this radical thesis draws our attention.

Freud´s vision and our NHS

11/30/2018

open to public
Organizer: Institute of Psychoanalysis
Venue: Institute of Psychoanalysis
112A Shirland Road
W9 2BT London
United Kingdom
>> Website

One hundred years ago, in 1918, Freud offered his vision of a “psychotherapy for the people”, available free of charge to all those in need. This vision was realised a few years later, first of all in Berlin and Vienna, where out-patient clinics and in-patient sanatoria provided free treatment. The social ambition was, in Freud’s words, to “help these sufferers in their struggle to fulfil the demands of civilization”.

In this conference, the Institute of Psychoanalysis celebrates the 70th anniversary of the NHS. The contributors show the creativity of contemporary psychoanalysis in mental health services, ranging from the general practitioner, to psychiatric teams, to out-patient psychotherapy departments.

This conference is for:

GPs, mental health nurses and care workers
Psychoanalysts, psychiatrists, psychologists, psychotherapists, and IAPT workers
Clinical managers, commissioners, researchers
Those involved in supervising and training, individually or in Balint, reflective practice, and other groups
Speakers: Clare Gerada MBE, Carine Minne, Marcus Evans, Jo Stubley, David Bell

The Law of the Mother: Genevieve Morel in conversation with Darian Leader

12/14/2018 19:00

open to public
Organizer: Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research und Freud Museum London
Venue: Freud Museum London
20 Maresfield Gardens
NW3 5SX London
United Kingdom
>> Website
In this ground-breaking book, Genevieve Morel explores whether it is possible for the child to escape subjection from this maternal law and develop their own sexual identity.

Through clinical examples and critical commentary, the book illustrates the range and power of maternal influence on the child, and how this can generate different forms of sexual ambiguity.

The book avoids many of the moral and political prejudices that paralyze twenty-first century society, be they related to legislation on marriage, parentage or adoption, the status of “mental health”, or the limits to the supposed ownership of the human body. Insightful and revealing, The Law of the Mother will be of great interest to Lacanian psychoanalysts, as well as to researchers in the fields of gender studies and sexuality.

Geneviève Morel is a psychoanalyst practising in Paris and in Lille. She is a member of the Association Lilloise pour la Psychanalyse et son Histoire and of the group Savoir et Cliniques. She teaches at the University of Paris VIII. She is the author of several books including ‘Sexual Ambiguities’ (Psychology, Psychoanalysis & Psychotherapy).

Darian Leader is a psychoanalyst working in London and a member of the Centre for Freudian Analysis and Research and of The College of Psychoanalysts-UK. He is the author of several books including: ‘Why do women write more letters than they post?’; ‘Freud’s Footnotes’; ‘Stealing the Mona Lisa: What Art Stops Us From Seeing’; ‘Why do people get ill?’ (with David Corfield) , ‘The New Black: Mourning, Melancholia and Depression’, ‘What is Madness?’ , ‘Strictly Bipolar’ and ‘Hands’, and frequently about contemporary art.

Cost:
£9 - £12

The Future of Neuroscience, Attachment and Mentalizing: from research to clinical practice

05/18/2019 17:00

open to public
Organizer: UCL - University College London
Venue: University College London
Gower St
WC1E 6BT London
United Kingdom
>> Website

This conference will be one of the first conferences to explicitly focus on the application of neuroscience and neurobiology to clinical issues. Leading speakers will discuss recently emerging findings in affective neuroscience with immediate clinical relevance. They will focus on incorporating neurobiological findings with the aim to provide what every clinician should know from a neuroscience point of view. Clinical themes covered will include children and adults with a trauma history, autism, and early preventative interventions for at-risk children and parents.

Another aim of the conference is further exchange between practitioners and leading experts in affective neuroscience. Clinical workshops on Sunday will aim to provide practitioners with the possibility to discuss the influence of the most recent emerging findings on clinical practice, and offer the opportunity for in-depth interaction with key practitioners in the field.

51st IPA Congress - The Feminine

07/24/2019 - 07/27/2019

open to public
Organizer: IPA - International Psychoanalytical Association
Venue: QEII Centre
Broad Sanctuary
SW1P 3EE London
United Kingdom
>> Website

Psychoanalytic theory and practice both have a part to play in addressing the question of ‘the feminine’. Our goal for this Congress is to focus on issues that affect the everyday life and experiences of both women and men.

Since the late nineteenth century, concerns and problems related to the female condition, which were previously normalised or silenced, have become increasingly visible in different cultures.

Psychoanalytic theories on the feminine have widened and diversified. Important debates emerged early on, such as the Freud-Jones controversy on primary and secondary femininity, and the role of penis envy in development. Many female analysts developed and presented their ideas on these issues. These debates are ongoing and have become increasingly sophisticated. The riddle of bisexuality has stood at the centre of psychoanalysis since the beginning and contains both the feminine and the masculine. The question of whether there is a set of fantasies that are connected more with the feminine than with the masculine remains open.

Each society, culture or historical period attributes certain behaviours to the feminine or the masculine. However, most people have their own personal mixture of these, and it would be an over-simplification to prescribe a fixed set of properties to one particular sex. The psychoanalytic approach is now broader, including the feminine within the field of the masculine. New family configurations and sexual and gender diversity have challenged established standards of sexual binarism and have invited new questions about femininity and masculinity. The feminine protects the infant and its development; it guarantees survival and furnishes the mother tongue. In the intermediary spaces of two, three or more persons, all the involved persons continuously negotiate the positions of the feminine and the masculine, changing the question of what should be labelled as feminine and what as masculine. We have therefore had to revisit many concepts whose relevance for clinical practice is unquestionable: among them, the Oedipal-castration complex and its traditional resolution, the feminine superego, and women’s desire for children.

Within this framework, the IPA takes up the challenge of updating and rethinking classical psychoanalytic views on the feminine and their repercussions in psychoanalysis.



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